Forex for a trader
Forex trading definition terms

Forex trading definition termsPart 1: What Is Forex Trading ? – A Definition & Introduction. An Introduction to FOREX Trading: This free Forex mini-course is designed to teach you the basics of the Forex market and Forex trading in a non-boring way. I know you can find this information elsewhere on the web, but let’s face it; most of it is scattered and pretty dry to read. I will try to make this tutorial as fun as possible so that you can learn about Forex trading and have a good time doing it. Upon completion of this course you will have a solid understanding of the Forex market and Forex trading, and you will then be ready to progress to learning real-world Forex trading strategies. What is the Forex market? • What is Forex? – The basics… Basically, the Forex market is where banks, businesses, governments, investors and traders come to exchange and speculate on currencies. The Forex market is also referred to as the ‘Fx market’, ‘Currency market’, ‘Foreign exchange currency market’ or ‘Foreign currency market’, and it is the largest and most liquid market in the world with an average daily turnover of $3.98 trillion. The Fx market is open 24 hours a day, 5 days a week with the most important world trading centers being located in London, New York, Tokyo, Zurich, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Singapore, Paris, and Sydney. It should be noted that there is no central marketplace for the Forex market; trading is instead said to be conducted ‘over the counter’; it’s not like stocks where there is a central marketplace with all orders processed like the NYSE. Forex is a product quoted by all the major banks, and not all banks will have the exact same price. Now, the broker platforms take all theses feeds from the different banks and the quotes we see from our broker are an approximate average of them. It’s the broker who is effectively transacting the trade and taking the other side of it…they ‘make the market’ for you. When you buy a currency pair…

your broker is selling it to you, not ‘another trader’. • A brief history of the Forex market. Ok, I admit, this part is going to be a little bit boring, but it’s important to have some basic background knowledge of the history of the Forex market so that you know a little bit about why it exists and how it got here. So here is the history of the Forex market in a nutshell: In 1876, something called the gold exchange standard was implemented. Basically it said that all paper currency had to be backed by solid gold; the idea here was to stabilize world currencies by pegging them to the price of gold. It was a good idea in theory, but in reality it created boom-bust patterns which ultimately led to the demise of the gold standard. The gold standard was dropped around the beginning of World War 2 as major European countries did not have enough gold to support all the currency they were printing to pay for large military projects. Although the gold standard was ultimately dropped, the precious metal never lost its spot as the ultimate form of monetary value. The world then decided to have fixed exchange rates that resulted in the U. S. dollar being the primary reserve currency and that it would be the only currency backed by gold, this is known as the ‘Bretton Woods System’ and it happened in 1944 (I know you super excited to know that). In 1971 the U. S. declared that it would no longer exchange gold for U. S. dollars that were held in foreign reserves, this marked the end of the Bretton Woods System. It was this break down of the Bretton Woods System that ultimately led to the mostly global acceptance of floating foreign exchange rates in 1976. This was effectively the “birth” of the current foreign currency exchange market, although it did not become widely electronically traded until about the mid 1990s. (OK! Now let’s move on to some more entertaining topics!)… What is Forex Trading?

Forex trading as it relates to retail traders (like you and I) is the speculation on the price of one currency against another. For example, if you think the euro is going to rise against the U. S. dollar, you can buy the EURUSD currency pair low and then (hopefully) sell it at a higher price to make a profit. Of course, if you buy the euro against the dollar (EURUSD), and the U. S. dollar strengthens, you will then be in a losing position. So, it’s important to be aware of the risk involved in trading Forex, and not only the reward. • Why is the Forex market so popular? Being a Forex trader offers the most amazing potential lifestyle of any profession in the world. It’s not easy to get there, but if you are determined and disciplined, you can make it happen. Here’s a quick list of skills you will need to reach your goals in the Forex market: Ability – to take a loss without becoming emotional. Confidence – to believe in yourself and your trading strategy, and to have no fear. Dedication – to becoming the best Forex trader you can be. Discipline – to remain calm and unemotional in a realm of constant temptation (the market) Flexibility – to trade changing market conditions successfully. Focus – to stay concentrated on your trading plan and to not stray off course. Logic – to look at the market from an objective and straight forward perspective. Organization – to forge and reinforce positive trading habits. Patience – to wait for only the highest-probability trading strategies according to your plan. Realism – to not think you are going to get rich quick and understand the reality of the market and trading.

Savvy – to take advantage of your trading edge when it arises and be aware of what is happening in the market at all times. Self-control – to not over-trade and over-leverage your trading account. As traders, we can take advantage of the high leverage and volatility of the Forex market by learning and mastering and effective Forex trading strategy, building an effective trading plan around that strategy, and following it with ice-cold discipline. Money management is key here; leverage is a double-edged sword and can make you a lot of money fast or lose you a lot of money fast. The key to money management in Forex trading is to always know the exact dollar amount you have at risk before entering a trade and be TOTALLY OK with losing that amount of money, because any one trade could be a loser. More on money management later in the course. • Who trades Forex and why? Banks – The interbank market allows for both the majority of commercial Forex transactions and large amounts of speculative trading each day. Some large banks will trade billions of dollars, daily. Sometimes this trading is done on behalf of customers, however much is done by proprietary traders who are trading for the bank’s own account. Companies – Companies need to use the foreign exchange market to pay for goods and services from foreign countries and also to sell goods or services in foreign countries.

An important part of the daily Forex market activity comes from companies looking to exchange currency in order to transact in other countries. Governments Central banks – A country’s central bank can play an important role in the foreign exchange markets. They can cause an increase or decrease in the value of their nation’s currency by trying to control money supply, inflation, and (or) interest rates. They can use their substantial foreign exchange reserves to try and stabilize the market. Hedge funds – Somewhere around 70 to 90% of all foreign exchange transactions are speculative in nature. This means, the person or institutions that bought or sold the currency has no plan of actually taking delivery of the currency; instead, the transaction was executed with sole intention of speculating on the price movement of that particular currency. Retail speculators (you and I) are small cheese compared to the big hedge funds that control and speculate with billions of dollars of equity each day in the currency markets. Individuals – If you have ever traveled to a different country and exchanged your money into a different currency at the airport or bank, you have already participated in the foreign currency exchange market. Investors – Investment firms who manage large portfolios for their clients use the Fx market to facilitate transactions in foreign securities.

For example, an investment manager controlling an international equity portfolio needs to use the Forex market to purchase and sell several currency pairs in order to pay for foreign securities they want to purchase. Retail Forex traders – Finally, we come to retail Forex traders (you and I). The retail Forex trading industry is growing everyday with the advent of Forex trading platforms and their ease of accessibility on the internet. Retail Forex traders access the market indirectly either through a broker or a bank. There are two main types of retail Forex brokers that provide us with the ability to speculate on the currency market: brokers and dealers. Brokers work as an agent for the trader by trying to find the best price in the market and executing on behalf of the customer. For this, they charge a commission on top of the price obtained in the market. Dealers are also called market makers because they ‘make the market’ for the trader and act as the counter-party to their transactions, they quote a price they are willing to deal at and are compensated through the spread, which is the difference between the buy and sell price (more on this later). Advantages of Trading the Forex Market: • Forex is the largest market in the world, with daily volumes exceeding $3 trillion per day. This means dense liquidity which makes it easy to get in and out of positions. • Trade whenever you want: There is no opening bell in the Forex market. You can enter or exit a trade whenever you want from Sunday around 5pm EST to Friday around 4pm EST. • Ease of access: You can fund your trading account with as little as $250 at many retail brokers and begin trading the same day in some cases. Straight through order execution allows you to trade at the click of a mouse. • Fewer currency pairs to focus on, instead of getting lost trying to analyze thousands of stocks.

• Freedom to trade anywhere in the world with the only requirements being a laptop and internet connection. • Commission-free trading with many retail market-makers and overall lower transaction costs than stocks and commodities. • Volatility allows traders to profit in any market condition and provides for high-probability weekly trading opportunities. Also, there is no structural market bias like the long bias of the stock market, so traders have equal opportunity to profit in rising or falling markets. While the forex market is clearly a great market to trade, I would note to all beginners that trading carries both the potential for reward and risk. Many people come into the markets thinking only about the reward and ignoring the risks involved, this is the fastest way to lose all of your trading account money. If you want to get started trading the Fx market on the right track, it’s critical that you are aware of and accept the fact that you could lose on any given trade you take. There is no denying that forex trading carries a wealth of positives, but that doesn’t stop it from being confusing to those who are embracing the forex market for the first time. What many upstart traders will likely find is a wealth of countless terms and phrases being thrown in their direction. Thankfully, help is now at hand to help you get up to speed. The following is a complete glossary of forex terms, which provides key definitions in the simplest way possible. Whether you’re a novice trader looking to learn the ropes or an experienced trader looking to brush up, the following forex glossary is something that you are going to want to keep close by. The act of taking advantage of countervailing prices within different markets through the sale or purchase of a currency. Thus, simultaneously taking an equal and opposite position in a related market to profit from small price differentials.

“Ask” (or “ask price”) is a term used to describe the price at which a trader accepts to buy a particular currency. “Asset” refers to an item or resource of value, such as a currency or currency pair. Within a currency pair, the first currency listed is known as the “base currency”. For example, when it comes to the GBPUSD pairing, the GBP functions as the base currency. The opposite of a bull market, the term “bear market” is used to describe the price of an asset, currency, or security that is in decline. “Bear market” can also be shortened to simply “bear”, while the term “bearish” is also used to describe the state of the forex market when it’s in decline. The opposite of a bear market, this term describes when the price of an asset, currency, or security is rising. Much like the term “bear market”, “bull market” is also often shortened, so you can expect to hear the terms “bull” and “bullish” used regularly. “Bid” (or “bid price”) is the term used to describe the price at which a trader is willing to sell a particular currency. A buy limit order is an order to push through a transaction at a specified price or lower, with the term “limit” referring to the price threshold. Relates to when an investor borrows at a lower-than-average interest rate in order to buy assets that can potentially produce higher interest rates. Closed Position.

Closing a position means bringing a transaction to an end, incurring any related profits or losses as a result. Closing Market Rate. Sometimes listed as the closing price, it represents the final value that a currency is traded at during any specific time frame, day, or candle. Currency Appreciation. When a currency’s value rises against another, it will commonly be addressed as “currency appreciation”. Currency Futures. Currency futures are contracts that state the price that a currency can be sold or bought for at a predetermined future date. Future contracts are a widely-used hedging tool amongst traders. Currency Pair. The nucleus of the forex market, a currency pair is what’s being traded within any forex transaction. Currency pairs take on various forms, with most pairs labelled “major”, “minor”, or “exotic”.

For example, GBPUSD qualifies as a major currency pair. A graph that breaks down the movements of a particular currency that have occurred within a single trading day. Day Trade. A forex trade that is opened and closed on the same day. Demo Account. Sometimes called a “demo account”, “dummy account”, “virtual currency account”, or “practice account”, a demo account is a forex trading account that makes use of virtual funds. This allows any trader to explore the market, making trades in an environment that doesn’t involve the use of any real capital. Depth of Market. The volume of active buying and selling orders placed for a currency, covering a wide degree of prices. Drawdown. When the price of a currency dips, the difference between the peak and the new low is labelled the “drawdown”.

Representing a distinct type of broker. An ECN Broker makes use of Electronic Communications Networks (ECNs) to provide clients with access to liquidity providers. Exchange Rate. Representing what the forex market is built upon, the exchange rate is the cost at which one currency can be traded for another. Execution. This term refers to when a trade is put in motion and subsequently completed. Exposure. “Exposure” is a term that is used to address the amount invested in a currency and its associated market risks. Addresses the completion of an order, along with the price that it has been completed at. Fill or Kill. If an investor has a set price in mind for a forex transaction, he or she can choose to implement a fill or kill order. What this means is that if the order isn’t fulfilled at the exact predetermined price, it is terminated.

Floating Exchange Rate. A term used to describe any exchange rate that is currently not fixed. A floating exchange rate tends to fluctuate dependent on the supply and demand (along with other factors) of a particular currency relative to other currencies. Forex Chart. Similar to a daily chart, a forex chart is a digital chart that highlights points and price movements related to a currency pair. Forex charts can usually be extended to cover days, weeks, months, and even years. Forex Scalping. A notable trading strategy that is based upon the idea that if you open and close a trade—buying and selling a currency—within a short space of time, you are likelier to earn profit than you would through large price movements. What forex scalping tends to represent is the “little and often” approach when it comes to forex trading. Forex Signal System.

Arguably the most commonly advertised forex service, a forex signal system works by issuing forex signals to subscribers related to current market activity. This signal (which can be issued through a number of means) can trigger a trade either automatically or manually. For example, a forex signal system may alert you that it’s a suitable time to either buy or sell a particular currency. Forex Spot Rate. The forex spot rate determines the exchange rate that a currency can be purchased or sold at. Forex Trading Robot. While not strictly a “robot” per se, a forex trading robot does refer to a piece of software that is designed to operate as a guide. It’s automated and should help determine when you should either buy or sell a currency pair. Fundamental Analysis. The act of determining the impact that key political and economic events (unemployment rates, interest rate announcements, and so forth) have on the forex market. Traders conduct such analysis as a means to predict the future direction of the market with regard to their portfolios. Forex (FX) is the market in which currencies are traded. The forex market is the largest, most liquid market in the world, with average traded values that can be trillions of dollars per day. It includes all of the currencies in the world. Real-Time Forex Trading. BREAKING DOWN 'Forex - FX' There is no central marketplace for currency exchange; trade is conducted over the counter. The forex market is open 24 hours a day, five days a week, except for holidays, and currencies are traded worldwide.

The forex is the largest market in the world in terms of the total cash value traded, and any person, firm or country may participate in this market. The term foreign exchange is usually abbreviated as "forex" and occasionally as "FX." The global foreign exchange market is the largest and the most liquid financial market in the world, with average daily volumes in the trillions of dollars. Forex transactions take place on either a spot or a forward basis. There is no centralized market for forex transactions, which are executed over the counter and around the clock. The largest foreign exchange markets are located in major financial centers like London, New York, Singapore, Tokyo, Frankfurt, Hong Kong and Sydney. Just How Large Is the Forex Market? The forex market is unique for several reasons, mainly because of its size. Trading volume is generally very large. As an example, trading in foreign exchange markets averaged $5.1 trillion per day in April 2016, according to the Bank for International Settlements, which is owned by 60 central banks, and is used to work in monetary and financial responsibility. The world's largest trading centers can be found in London, New York, Singapore and Tokyo. How to Trade in the Forex Market. The market is open 24 hours a day, five days a week across major financial centers across the globe. This means that you can buy or sell currencies at any time during the day. The foreign exchange market isn't exactly a one-stop shop. There are a whole variety of different avenues that an investor can go through in order to execute forex trades. You can go through different dealers or through different financial centers, which use a host of electronic networks.

From a historic standpoint, foreign exchange was once a concept for governments, large companies and hedge funds. But in today's world, trading currencies is as easy as a click of a mouse — accessibility is not an issue, which means anyone can do it. In fact, many investment firms offer the chance for individuals to open accounts and to trade currencies however and whenever they choose. When trading in the forex market, you're buying or selling the currency of a particular country. But there's no physical exchange of money from one party to another. That's what happens at a foreign exchange kiosk — think of a tourist visiting Times Square in New York City from Japan. He may be converting his (physical) yen to actual U. S. dollar cash (and may be charged a commission fee to do so) so he can spend his money while he's traveling. But in the world of electronic markets, traders are usually taking a position in a specific currency, with the hope that there will be some upward movement and strength in the currency they're buying (or weakness if they're selling) so they can make a profit. A spot deal is for immediate delivery, which is defined as two business days for most currency pairs. The major exception is the purchase or sale of U. S. dollars vs. Canadian dollars, which is settled in one business day. The business day calculation excludes Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays in either currency of the traded pair. During the Christmas and Easter season, some spot trades can take as long as six days to settle. Funds are exchanged on the settlement date, not the transaction date.

The U. S. dollar is the most actively traded currency. The euro is the most actively traded counter currency, followed by the Japanese yen, British pound and Swiss franc. Market moves are driven by a combination of speculation, especially in the short term; economic strength and growth; and interest rate differentials. Forward Transactions. Any forex transaction that settles for a date later than spot is considered a "forward." The price is calculated by adjusting the spot rate to account for the difference in interest rates between the two currencies. The amount of the adjustment is called "forward points." The forward points reflect only the interest rate differential between two markets. They are not a forecast of how the spot market will trade at a date in the future. A forward is a tailor-made contract: it can be for any amount of money and can settle on any date that's not a weekend or holiday. Transactions with maturities longer than a year are relatively unusual, but are possible. As in a spot transaction, funds are exchanged on the settlement date. A "future" is similar to a forward in that it's for a date longer than spot, and the price has the same basis. Unlike a forward, it's traded on an exchange, and can only be executed for specified amounts and dates. With a futures contract, the buyer pays a portion of the value of the contract up front.

That value is marked-to-market daily, and the buyer either pays or receives money based on the change in value. Futures are most commonly used by speculators, and the contracts are usually closed out before maturity. Differences Between Forex and Other Markets. There are some major differences between the forex and other markets: Fewer rules : This means investors aren't held to as strict standards or regulations as those in the stock, futures or options markets. There are no clearing houses and no central bodies that oversee the forex market. Fees and commissions : Since trades don't take place on a traditional exchange, you won't find the same fees or commissions that you would on another market. Full access : There's no cut-off as to when you can and cannot trade. Because the market is open 24 hours a day, you can trade at any time of day. Ease : Because it's such a liquid market, you can get in and out whenever you want and you can buy as much currency as you can afford. The price at which the market is prepared to sell a product.

Prices are quoted two-way as BidAsk. The Ask price is also known as the Offer. In FX trading, the Ask represents the price at which a trader can buy the base currency, shown to the left in a currency pair. For example, in the quote USDCHF 1.452732, the base currency is USD, and the Ask price is 1.4532, meaning you can buy one US dollar for 1.4532 Swiss francs. In CFD trading, the Ask also represents the price at which a trader can buy the product. For example, in the quote for UK OIL 111.13111.16, the product quoted is UK OIL and the Ask price is ?111.16 for one unit of the underlying market.* At best An instruction given to a dealer to buy or sell at the best rate that can be obtained at a specific time. At or better An instruction given to a dealer to buy or sell at a specific price or better. AUS 200 A term for the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX 200), which is an index of the top 200 companies (by market capitalization) listed on the Australian stock exchange. Aussie Refers to the AUDUSD (Australian DollarU.

S. Dollar) pair. Also "Oz" or "Ozzie". A type of chart which consists of four significant points: the high and the low prices, which form the vertical bar; the opening price, which is marked with a horizontal line to the left of the bar; and the closing price, which is marked with a horizontal line to the right of the bar. Barrier level A certain price of great importance included in the structure of a Barrier Option. If a Barrier Level price is reached, the terms of a specific Barrier Option call for a series of events to occur. Barrier option Any number of different option structures (such as knock-in, knock-out, no touch, double-no-touch-DNT) that attaches great importance to a specific price trading. In a no-touch barrier, a large defined payout is awarded to the buyer of the option by the seller if the strike price is not 'touched' before expiry. This creates an incentive for the option seller to drive prices through the strike level and creates an incentive for the option buyer to defend the strike level. Base currency The first currency in a currency pair. It shows how much the base currency is worth as measured against the second currency. For example, if the USDCHF (U. S. DollarSwiss Franc) rate equals 1.6215, then one USD is worth CHF 1.6215.

In the forex market, the US dollar is normally considered the base currency for quotes, meaning that quotes are expressed as a unit of $1 USD per the other currency quoted in the pair. The primary exceptions to this rule are the British pound, the euro and the Australian dollar. Base rate The lending rate of the central bank of a given country. Basing A chart pattern used in technical analysis that shows when demand and supply of a product are almost equal. It results in a narrow trading range and the merging of support and resistance levels. Basis point A unit of measurement used to describe the minimum change in the price of a product. BearishBear market Negative for price direction; favoring a declining market. For example, "We are bearish EURUSD" means that we think the euro will weaken against the dollar. Bears Traders who expect prices to decline and may be holding short positions.

Bidask spread The difference between the bid and the ask (offer) price. Bid price The price at which the market is prepared to buy a product. Prices are quoted two-way as BidAsk. In FX trading, the Bid represents the price at which a trader can sell the base currency, shown to the left in a currency pair. For example, in the quote USDCHF 1.452732, the base currency is USD, and the Bid price is 1.4527, meaning you can sell one US Dollar for 1.4527 Swiss francs. In CFD trading, the Bid also represents the price at which a trader can sell the product. For example, in the quote for UK OIL 111.13111.16, the Bid price is ?111.13 for one unit of the underlying market.* Big figure Refers to the first three digits of a currency quote, such as 117 USDJPY or 1.26 in EURUSD. If the price moves by 1.5 big figures, it has moved 150 pips. BIS The Bank for International Settlements located in Basel, Switzerland, is the central bank for central banks. The BIS frequently acts as the market intermediary between national central banks and the market. The BIS has become increasingly active as central banks have increased their currency reserve management. When the BIS is reported to be buying or selling at a level, it is usually for a central bank and thus the amounts can be large. The BIS is used to avoid markets mistaking buying or selling interest for official government intervention.

Black box The term used for systematic, model-based or technical traders. Blow off The upside equivalent of capitulation. When shorts throw in the towel and cover any remaining short positions. BOC Bank of Canada, the central bank of Canada. BOE Bank of England, the central bank of the UK. BOJ Bank of Japan, the central bank of Japan. Bollinger bands A tool used by technical analysts. A band plotted two standard deviations on either side of a simple moving average, which often indicates support and resistance levels. Bond A name for debt which is issued for a specified period of time. Book In a professional trading environment, a book is the summary of a trader's or desk's total positions. British Retail Consortium (BRC) shop price index A British measure of the rate of inflation at various surveyed retailers. This index only looks at price changes in goods purchased in retail outlets. Broker An individual or firm that acts as an intermediary, bringing buyers and sellers together for a fee or commission. In contrast, a dealer commits capital and takes one side of a position, hoping to earn a spread (profit) by closing out the position in a subsequent trade with another party.

Buck Market slang for one million units of a dollar-based currency pair, or for the US dollar in general. BullishBull market Favoring a strengthening market and rising prices. For example, "We are bullish EURUSD” means that we think the euro will strengthen against the dollar. Bulls Traders who expect prices to rise and who may be holding long positions. Bundesbank Germany's central bank. Buy Taking a long position on a product. Buy dips Looking to buy 20-30-pippoint pullbacks in the course of an intra-day trend. One of approximately five times during the forex trading day when a large amount of currency must be bought or sold to fill a commercial customer’s orders. Typically these times are associated with market volatility. The regular fixes are as follows (all times NY): 10:00am - WMHCO (World Market House Company) 11:00am - WMHCO (World Market House Company) - more important. Flat or flat reading Economic data readings matching the previous period's levels that are unchanged. Flatsquare Dealer jargon used to describe a position that has been completely reversed, e. g. you bought $500,000 and then sold $500,000, thereby creating a neutral (flat) position. Follow-through Fresh buying or selling interest after a directional break of a particular price level. The lack of follow-through usually indicates a directional move will not be sustained and may reverse. FOMC Federal Open Market Committee, the policy-setting committee of the US Federal Reserve.

FOMC minutes Written record of FOMC policy-setting meetings are released three weeks following a meeting. The minutes provide more insight into the FOMC's deliberations and can generate significant market reactions. Foreign exchangeforexFX The simultaneous buying of one currency and selling of another. The global market for such transactions is referred to as the forex or FX market. Forward The pre-specified exchange rate for a foreign exchange contract settling at some agreed future date, based on the interest rate differential between the two currencies involved. Forward points The pips added to or subtracted from the current exchange rate in order to calculate a forward price. FRA40 A name for the index of the top 40 companies (by market capitalization) listed on the French stock exchange. FRA40 is also known as CAC40. FTSE 100 The name of the UK 100 index. Fundamental analysis The assessment of all information available on a tradable product to determine its future outlook and therefore predict where the price is heading.

Often non-measurable and subjective assessments, as well as quantifiable measurements, are made in fundamental analysis. Funds Refers to hedge fund types active in the market. Also used as another term for the USDCAD (U. S. DollarCanadian Dollar) pair. Future An agreement between two parties to execute a transaction at a specified time in the future when the price is agreed in the present. Futures contract An obligation to exchange a good or instrument at a set price and specified quantity grade at a future date. The primary difference between a Future and a Forward is that Futures are typically traded over an exchange (Exchange - Traded Contacts - ETC), versus Forwards, which are considered Over The Counter (OTC) contracts. An OTC is any contract NOT traded on an exchange. Illiquid Little volume being traded in the market; a lack of liquidity often creates choppy market conditions. IMM International Monetary Market, the Chicago-based currency futures market, that is part of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. IMM futures A traditional futures contract based on major currencies against the US dollar. IMM futures are traded on the floor of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. IMM session 8:00am - 3:00pm New York.

INDU Abbreviation for the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Industrial production Measures the total value of output produced by manufacturers, mines and utilities. This data tends to react quickly to the expansions and contractions of the business cycle and can act as a leading indicator of employment and personal income data. Inflation An economic condition whereby prices for consumer goods rise, eroding purchasing power. Initial margin requirement The initial deposit of collateral required to enter into a position. Interbank rates The foreign exchange rates which large international banks quote to each other. Interest Adjustments in cash to reflect the effect of owing or receiving the notional amount of equity of a CFD position. Intervention Action by a central bank to affect the value of its currency by entering the market. Concerted intervention refers to action by a number of central banks to control exchange rates.

Introducing broker A person or corporate entity which introduces accounts to a broker in return for a fee. INX Symbol for S&P 500 index. IPO A private company’s initial offer of stock to the public. Short for initial public offering. ISM manufacturing index An index that assesses the state of the US manufacturing sector by surveying executives on expectations for future production, new orders, inventories, employment and deliveries. Values over 50 generally indicate an expansion, while values below 50 indicate contraction. ISM non-manufacturing An index that surveys service sector firms for their outlook, representing the other 80% of the US economy not covered by the ISM Manufacturing Report. Values over 50 generally indicate an expansion, while values below 50 indicate contraction. In CFD trading, the Ask represents the price a trader can buy the product. For example, in the quote for UK OIL 111.13111.16, the product quoted is UK OIL and the ask price is ?111.16 for one unit of the underlying market.* Offered If a market is said to be trading offered, it means a pair is attracting heavy selling interest, or offers. Offsetting transaction A trade that cancels or offsets some or all of the market risk of an open position.

On top Attempting to sell at the current market order price. One cancels the other order (OCO) A designation for two orders whereby if one part of the two orders is executed, then the other is automatically cancelled. One touch An option that pays a fixed amount to the holder if the market touches the predetermined Barrier Level. Open order An order that will be executed when a market moves to its designated price. Normally associated with good 'til cancelled orders. Open position An active trade with corresponding unrealized P&L, which has not been offset by an equal and opposite deal. Option A derivative which gives the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell a product at a specific price before a specified date. Order An instruction to execute a trade. Order book A system used to show market depth of traders willing to buy and sell at prices beyond the best available.

Over the counter (OTC) Used to describe any transaction that is not conducted via an exchange. Overnight position A trade that remains open until the next business day. A rollover is the simultaneous closing of an open position for today's value date and the opening of the same position for the next day's value date at a price reflecting the interest rate differential between the two currencies. In the spot forex market, trades must be settled in two business days. For example, if a trader sells 100,000 Euros on Tuesday, then the trader must deliver 100,000 Euros on Thursday, unless the position is rolled over. As a service to customers, all open forex positions at the end of the day (5:00 PM New York time) are automatically rolled over to the next settlement date. The rollover adjustment is simply the accounting of the cost-of-carry on a day-to-day basis. Learn more about FOREX. com's rollover policy. Round trip A trade that has been opened and subsequently closed by an equal and opposite deal.

Running profitloss An indicator of the status of your open positions; that is, unrealized money that you would gain or lose should you close all your open positions at that point in time. RUT Symbol for Russell 2000 index. The time remaining until a contract expires. Tokyo session 09:00 – 18:00 (Tokyo). Tomorrow next (tomnext) Simultaneous buying and selling of a currency for delivery the following day. TP Stands for “take profit.” Refers to limit orders that look to sell above the level that was bought, or buy back below the level that was sold. Trade balance Measures the difference in value between imported and exported goods and services. Nations with trade surpluses (exports greater than imports), such as Japan, tend to see their currencies appreciate, while countries with trade deficits (imports greater than exports), such as the US, tend to see their currencies weaken. Trade size The number of units of product in a contract or lot. Trading bid A pair is acting strong andor moving higher; bids keep entering the market and pushing prices up. Trading halt A postponement to trading that is not a suspension from trading. Trading heavy A market that feels like it wants to move lower, usually associated with an offered market that will not rally despite buying attempts. Trading offered A pair is acting weak andor moving lower, and offers to sell keep coming into the market.

Trading range The range between the highest and lowest price of a stock usually expressed with reference to a period of time. For example: 52-week trading range. Trailing stop A trailing stop allows a trade to continue to gain in value when the market price moves in a favorable direction, but automatically closes the trade if the market price suddenly moves in an unfavorable direction by a specified distance. Placing contingent orders may not necessarily limit your losses. Transaction cost The cost of buying or selling a financial product. Transaction date The date on which a trade occurs. Trend Price movement that produces a net change in value. An uptrend is identified by higher highs and higher lows. A downtrend is identified by lower highs and lower lows. Turnover The total money value or volume of all executed transactions in a given time period. Two-way price When both a bid and offer rate is quoted for a forex transaction. TYO10 Symbol for CBOE 10-Year Treasury Yield Index.

Forex Trading Terms And Meanings. When it comes to Forex terminology, there are many different words and phrases that you will see used on the various broker websites, forums and other Forex educational sites that you might find a little confusing to begin with. While some might be familiar or more obvious, there will be others that you haven’t heard of before. To help you get to grips with, and understand the various terms, we have put together this useful glossary. The simultaneous buying and selling of a currency pair, often used in short selling to produce small profits from the price differentials. In simple terms it is taking advantage of the price difference between multiple markets and capitalising on the imbalance. The lowest price that a seller is willing to accept with the bid price being the highest price that a buyer is willing to pay. In the case of Forex trading the ask price is the price that you are required to pay for your trade. Declining prices and a low confidence in the market. A bear market means that the prices are falling and selling is encouraged. High prices and the opposite to a bear market. In a bull market confidence is high and the markets are strong. The point at which you exit your trade.

This is usually a predetermined point which can be minutes, hours or longer in advance. A stop loss can be set to allow you to exit a Forex trade at a particular point. Carrying out a trades that balances the exposure in a specific currency or the entire exposure. There is no risk to the investment regardless of the exchange rate. Foreign Exchange or FX; Simultaneous buying and selling of a pair of currencies usually involving the US dollar as one of the pair currencies. Good-Till-Cancelled; An order to buy or sell an asset against another at a set price. The order remains until cancelled or executed. To reduce the risk of trading, hedging involves purchasing opposite positions in the market by buying one currency pair at one position and selling at another to minimise the risk involved. While it is a good strategy to minimise risk it can lead to zero profits unless the second trade is executed at the right time.

The increase in the cost of consumer goods and an overall economic condition which negatively affects purchasing power. To place a guarantee on future performance the trader must be able to make a sufficient deposit of collateral. London Interbank Offered Rate; When borrowing from other banks the large international banks use LIBOR. A unit of measurement, a lot is used to measure the value of the deal. The market maker is either a company or an individual that quotes a buy or sell price in order to make a profit on the spread. In the case of Forex trading the market maker is often the Forex broker. An option is a derivative financial instrument which establishes a contract between a trader and a broker in relation to the callput (buyingselling) of an asset during a pre-determined time frame (the expiry time). The assets are commonly stocks, bonds, indices or currency pairs and are priced according to market value plus a premium based on the expiry time. An instruction to a broker from a trader to execute a trade. It can be placed at the market price or a specific price and is good until filled or close of business. The smallest measurement of movement in price quoted in Forex trading. It is the smallest upward or downward movements and can be as little as 0.0001 pip. A good example is the EURUSD - 140.005 - to 140.004 Euro.

This movement indicates one pip. Automated software that is used to trade on your behalf. A robot software uses a variety of market calculations, history and other data available to place the trades for you based on what is the most likely outcome. Robot trading is usually charged for on a subscription basis and can be more successful than your own trading habits as they remove all emotion and only deal in facts. Being a computer the sheer amount of information that they scan in seconds would take an individual a number of hours of research. The range is the difference in the price of an asset during a trading session. It will be the difference of the lowest and the highest points reached by a particular asset. If you don’t have time to be at your computer all day to monitor your Forex trade, stop loss is a strategy that can be used to exit the trade automatically when a specific price point is reached. It is available with most Forex brokers and is well suited to part time traders. The spread is the difference between the bid price and the offer price used to measure the liquidity of the market. The smaller the spread, the more liquid the market.

A method of evaluating stocks and determining how much risk is being taken or how much should be taken. This information is then used to devise short or long-term investment objectives. An effective trading plan will also advise on the type of trading systems and analytical tools that should be used. The statistical measurement of the dispersion of returns for a security or market index, in this case Forex currency pairs. High volatility indicates higher risk. Part 1: What Is Forex Trading ? – A Definition & Introduction. An Introduction to FOREX Trading: This free Forex mini-course is designed to teach you the basics of the Forex market and Forex trading in a non-boring way. I know you can find this information elsewhere on the web, but let’s face it; most of it is scattered and pretty dry to read. I will try to make this tutorial as fun as possible so that you can learn about Forex trading and have a good time doing it. Upon completion of this course you will have a solid understanding of the Forex market and Forex trading, and you will then be ready to progress to learning real-world Forex trading strategies. What is the Forex market? • What is Forex? – The basics… Basically, the Forex market is where banks, businesses, governments, investors and traders come to exchange and speculate on currencies. The Forex market is also referred to as the ‘Fx market’, ‘Currency market’, ‘Foreign exchange currency market’ or ‘Foreign currency market’, and it is the largest and most liquid market in the world with an average daily turnover of $3.98 trillion.

The Fx market is open 24 hours a day, 5 days a week with the most important world trading centers being located in London, New York, Tokyo, Zurich, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Singapore, Paris, and Sydney. It should be noted that there is no central marketplace for the Forex market; trading is instead said to be conducted ‘over the counter’; it’s not like stocks where there is a central marketplace with all orders processed like the NYSE. Forex is a product quoted by all the major banks, and not all banks will have the exact same price. Now, the broker platforms take all theses feeds from the different banks and the quotes we see from our broker are an approximate average of them. It’s the broker who is effectively transacting the trade and taking the other side of it…they ‘make the market’ for you. When you buy a currency pair…your broker is selling it to you, not ‘another trader’. • A brief history of the Forex market. Ok, I admit, this part is going to be a little bit boring, but it’s important to have some basic background knowledge of the history of the Forex market so that you know a little bit about why it exists and how it got here. So here is the history of the Forex market in a nutshell: In 1876, something called the gold exchange standard was implemented. Basically it said that all paper currency had to be backed by solid gold; the idea here was to stabilize world currencies by pegging them to the price of gold. It was a good idea in theory, but in reality it created boom-bust patterns which ultimately led to the demise of the gold standard.

The gold standard was dropped around the beginning of World War 2 as major European countries did not have enough gold to support all the currency they were printing to pay for large military projects. Although the gold standard was ultimately dropped, the precious metal never lost its spot as the ultimate form of monetary value. The world then decided to have fixed exchange rates that resulted in the U. S. dollar being the primary reserve currency and that it would be the only currency backed by gold, this is known as the ‘Bretton Woods System’ and it happened in 1944 (I know you super excited to know that). In 1971 the U. S. declared that it would no longer exchange gold for U. S. dollars that were held in foreign reserves, this marked the end of the Bretton Woods System. It was this break down of the Bretton Woods System that ultimately led to the mostly global acceptance of floating foreign exchange rates in 1976. This was effectively the “birth” of the current foreign currency exchange market, although it did not become widely electronically traded until about the mid 1990s. (OK! Now let’s move on to some more entertaining topics!)… What is Forex Trading? Forex trading as it relates to retail traders (like you and I) is the speculation on the price of one currency against another. For example, if you think the euro is going to rise against the U. S. dollar, you can buy the EURUSD currency pair low and then (hopefully) sell it at a higher price to make a profit.

Of course, if you buy the euro against the dollar (EURUSD), and the U. S. dollar strengthens, you will then be in a losing position. So, it’s important to be aware of the risk involved in trading Forex, and not only the reward. • Why is the Forex market so popular? Being a Forex trader offers the most amazing potential lifestyle of any profession in the world. It’s not easy to get there, but if you are determined and disciplined, you can make it happen. Here’s a quick list of skills you will need to reach your goals in the Forex market: Ability – to take a loss without becoming emotional. Confidence – to believe in yourself and your trading strategy, and to have no fear. Dedication – to becoming the best Forex trader you can be. Discipline – to remain calm and unemotional in a realm of constant temptation (the market) Flexibility – to trade changing market conditions successfully. Focus – to stay concentrated on your trading plan and to not stray off course. Logic – to look at the market from an objective and straight forward perspective. Organization – to forge and reinforce positive trading habits. Patience – to wait for only the highest-probability trading strategies according to your plan.

Realism – to not think you are going to get rich quick and understand the reality of the market and trading. Savvy – to take advantage of your trading edge when it arises and be aware of what is happening in the market at all times. Self-control – to not over-trade and over-leverage your trading account. As traders, we can take advantage of the high leverage and volatility of the Forex market by learning and mastering and effective Forex trading strategy, building an effective trading plan around that strategy, and following it with ice-cold discipline. Money management is key here; leverage is a double-edged sword and can make you a lot of money fast or lose you a lot of money fast. The key to money management in Forex trading is to always know the exact dollar amount you have at risk before entering a trade and be TOTALLY OK with losing that amount of money, because any one trade could be a loser. More on money management later in the course. • Who trades Forex and why? Banks – The interbank market allows for both the majority of commercial Forex transactions and large amounts of speculative trading each day. Some large banks will trade billions of dollars, daily. Sometimes this trading is done on behalf of customers, however much is done by proprietary traders who are trading for the bank’s own account. Companies – Companies need to use the foreign exchange market to pay for goods and services from foreign countries and also to sell goods or services in foreign countries.

An important part of the daily Forex market activity comes from companies looking to exchange currency in order to transact in other countries. Governments Central banks – A country’s central bank can play an important role in the foreign exchange markets. They can cause an increase or decrease in the value of their nation’s currency by trying to control money supply, inflation, and (or) interest rates. They can use their substantial foreign exchange reserves to try and stabilize the market. Hedge funds – Somewhere around 70 to 90% of all foreign exchange transactions are speculative in nature. This means, the person or institutions that bought or sold the currency has no plan of actually taking delivery of the currency; instead, the transaction was executed with sole intention of speculating on the price movement of that particular currency. Retail speculators (you and I) are small cheese compared to the big hedge funds that control and speculate with billions of dollars of equity each day in the currency markets. Individuals – If you have ever traveled to a different country and exchanged your money into a different currency at the airport or bank, you have already participated in the foreign currency exchange market. Investors – Investment firms who manage large portfolios for their clients use the Fx market to facilitate transactions in foreign securities. For example, an investment manager controlling an international equity portfolio needs to use the Forex market to purchase and sell several currency pairs in order to pay for foreign securities they want to purchase. Retail Forex traders – Finally, we come to retail Forex traders (you and I). The retail Forex trading industry is growing everyday with the advent of Forex trading platforms and their ease of accessibility on the internet. Retail Forex traders access the market indirectly either through a broker or a bank. There are two main types of retail Forex brokers that provide us with the ability to speculate on the currency market: brokers and dealers.

Brokers work as an agent for the trader by trying to find the best price in the market and executing on behalf of the customer. For this, they charge a commission on top of the price obtained in the market. Dealers are also called market makers because they ‘make the market’ for the trader and act as the counter-party to their transactions, they quote a price they are willing to deal at and are compensated through the spread, which is the difference between the buy and sell price (more on this later). Advantages of Trading the Forex Market: • Forex is the largest market in the world, with daily volumes exceeding $3 trillion per day. This means dense liquidity which makes it easy to get in and out of positions. • Trade whenever you want: There is no opening bell in the Forex market. You can enter or exit a trade whenever you want from Sunday around 5pm EST to Friday around 4pm EST. • Ease of access: You can fund your trading account with as little as $250 at many retail brokers and begin trading the same day in some cases. Straight through order execution allows you to trade at the click of a mouse. • Fewer currency pairs to focus on, instead of getting lost trying to analyze thousands of stocks. • Freedom to trade anywhere in the world with the only requirements being a laptop and internet connection. • Commission-free trading with many retail market-makers and overall lower transaction costs than stocks and commodities. • Volatility allows traders to profit in any market condition and provides for high-probability weekly trading opportunities.

Also, there is no structural market bias like the long bias of the stock market, so traders have equal opportunity to profit in rising or falling markets. While the forex market is clearly a great market to trade, I would note to all beginners that trading carries both the potential for reward and risk. Many people come into the markets thinking only about the reward and ignoring the risks involved, this is the fastest way to lose all of your trading account money. If you want to get started trading the Fx market on the right track, it’s critical that you are aware of and accept the fact that you could lose on any given trade you take.



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